Wednesday, February 8, 2017

MYSTERY AUTHORS TURNING to YA #WriterWednesday

Many writers focus on one particular genre. Mystery writers get to choose from a plethora of subgenres: Cozy Mystery, Police Procedural, Hard-Boiled Detective, Soft-boiled Mystery, and Thriller. To name a few! There are also sub-sub genres where vampires or fairies or science fiction characters meld with cops and robbers. But even with all these choices, mystery writers sometimes decide to branch out into a totally different genre, Young Adult.

Of course, YA and Mystery aren't necessarily exclusive genres, but writing for adults and for young adults can feel like writing for two completely different worlds.

Lately, I've come across several interesting blog posts that deal with writing for the YA genre and am including the links here for those interested in or toying with the idea of writing YA.

Cherie Colyer wrote an article, Writing for a young adults audience, that gets right down to basics of audience, character development, and protagonist backstory.
http://cheriecolyer.blogspot.com/2016/07/writing-for-young-adults-audience.html

This is an interview of author Stacy Juba by author/interviewer Judy Penz Sheluk:
http://www.judypenzsheluk.com/2015/07/24/interview-with-an-author-stacy-juba/
plus: 10 YA Sports Novels for Teens and Tweens:
http://stacyjuba.com/blog/2015/07/20/ya-sports-novels/

Brian Klems welcomed teenaged writer Jamie S. Margolin to his blog site, The Writer's Dig, to discuss What NOT To Do When Writing YA Books:
http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/what-not-to-do-when-writing-ya-books-advice-from-a-teen-writer

And this is a post about the " Top 5 Dos of Writing YA Lit" on the WiseInkBlog (actually 4 with a "don't" included):
http://www.wiseinkblog.com/self-publishing-2/the-top-5-dos-of-writing-ya-lit/

Last, but not least, here are some writing tips from editors concerning authenticity, subject matter, and trends when writing YA:
https://blog.reedsy.com/editors-tips-write-young-adult-novel


Now that I have all this information at my fingertips, I may decide to write a young adult mystery of my own. Of course, this will require a whole new mindset and a willingness to take myself back to the days of my youth. Maybe I'll begin by stocking up on chocolate - and reading a good YA novel by a mystery writer to get me in the mood:

THE RAINBOW CONNECTION by Laurie Hanan

Review comments:
The character development is awesome
Wonderfully interwoven twists and turns









2 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for the mention, Gail!

    ReplyDelete
  2. You're welcome, Stacy. I'll be interviewing Laurie Hanan next week concerning her latest novel!

    ReplyDelete

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